Fresh Links Sundae – July 27, 2014 Edition

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. Often they are from the people whose work I admire or resonate with me. I hope you will find these ideas thought-provoking at the minimum. Even better, I hope these ideas will, over time, help my fellow IT pros make better decisions, be awesome, and kick ass!

Brady Orand and Global Knowledge are running a blog series “11 Common Mistakes of ITIL Foundation Newbies.” I had already featured the first five posts several weeks ago. Here are the last six installments of the series. ITIL Newbie Mistake #6: Being Too Process Focused  ITIL Newbie Mistake #7: CAB Meeting Burnout  ITIL Newbie Mistake #8: Too Much ITIL Talk  ITIL Newbie Mistake #9: Relying on Templates  ITIL Newbie Mistake #10: Expecting a Tool to Do the Work  ITIL Newbie Mistake #11: Thinking You’re Done. Ever. (Global Knowledge Training Blog)

Some manufacturers’ processing environments can have extreme swings in variability. As a result, those manufacturers need a more granular approach to diagnosing and correcting process flaws. Eric Auschitzky, Markus Hammer, and Agesan Rajagopaul discuss how advanced analytics can provide just such an approach. How big data can improve manufacturing (McKinsey & Company)

In his 20+ years of working in the IT industry, Barclay Rae continues to work with organization on fielding similar ITSM questions. He discusses the most important element for ITSM success that even trumps SLAs and KPIs. Do you have an SLA with your spouse..? (Barclay Rae Website)

Many organizations implements ITSM but neglect to have a CSI process in place. Stuart Rance talks about why he believes CSI is one of the biggest opportunities we have to create value for our IT customers. Building a CSI culture (The ITSM Review)

Many people talk about business digitalization as a portfolio of discrete game-changing technologies. Bob Lewis would argue that the digitization movement is different than what most people think because many have a false assumption about the digitization trend. The assumption of pervasive technology (IS Survivor Publishing)

To most people, innovation is risky, plagued with challenges, and hard to do successfully. Daniel Burrus illustrates how we can predict the changes accurately and be a great innovator. How to Transform Innovation ROI by Using the Science of Certainty to Accelerate Results (Daniel Burrus)

With the availability of many cloud technology and SaaS offering, companies are considering whether to leverage cloud for business intelligence and data analytics activities. John Myers discusses the emerging field of data analytics as a service and what criteria should an organization consider to determine whether it is ready for business analytics. Why Data Analytics as a Service? (EMA Blogs)

Many organizations are setting up the data analytics practice using big data technologies. Andrew Oliver outlines the top 10 worst practices to avoid. The 10 worst big data practices (Strategic Developer)

Fresh Links Sundae – September 8, 2013 Edition

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-fruit-sundae-image15278271Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. Often they are from the people whose work I admire or resonate with me. More importantly, I picked these articles to help my fellow IT professionals be more successful. I hope you will find these ideas thought-provoking at the minimum. Even better, I hope these ideas will, over time, help my fellow IT pros make better decisions, be awesome, and kick ass!

With IT being essential to the execution of nearly every job, Brad Power believes that business executives will need to continue to build their comfort level with managing IT more directly. Yes, Managing IT Is Your Job (Harvard Business Review)

Drawing from his own dieting experience, Earl Begley explains how building and following a plan are a must for an ITSM initiative to work. The ITSM Diet (The ITSM Review)

With the constant changes in business, many organizations are using IT in a much more sophisticated manner than they are used to be. Stewart Buchanan explains how organizations need better IT asset management controls to prevent unexpected costs from outweighing the benefits of new ways of using IT. Improve Your IT Asset Management Controls or Face Unbudgeted Costs (The ITAM Review)

Motivated by the interest in social-enablement and self-service, many organizations are looking at how best to manage and make knowledge accessible to their people. Barclay Rae gives some planning tips for your knowledge management effort . Knowledge Management Is More Than Just Buying A Tool (The ITSM Review)

Many IT organizations use popular metrics such as first contact resolution (FCR) or mean time to repair/resolve (MTTR) as a primary input into measuring service excellence. Dan Kane argues that well intended metrics don’t necessarily tell the whole story, and we can do better. First Contact Resolution is the last refuge of a scoundrel (Hazy ITSM)

In an effort to maximize his/her own productivity, some developers produce more extra code than the organization can test or make use of them. Dennis Stevens suggests six things that developers can work on that are better economic investments than writing the extra, untested code. Stop Writing Code You Can’t Yet Test (LeadingAgile)

With machines getting more proficient at doing many of the things people traditionally do on the job, this means people need to become smarter at things machines are not quite yet ready to take over. Michael Schrage suggests six different skills that can be useful in today’s workplace and should be taught in school. Six Classes Your Employer Wishes You Could Take (Harvard Business Review)

We live in a world where we want things to happen fast, faster and fastest. Mitch Joel suggests  we focus on spending the time you need to get better at your craft. 10,000 Hours And 20% Of Your Work Time (Six Pixels of Separation)

When it comes to finding and leading like-minded people to make real and powerful change that matters, Seth Godin explains why it is vital to build the tribe around the experience that the tribe members already want to have. Q&A: Tribes and the reality of worldview (Seth’s Blog)

Our flaws at work usually don’t vanish when we go home. Marshall Goldsmith advises us on whom we can approach to learn more about ourselves. How to Learn the Truth About Yourself (Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog)

Fresh Links Sundae – August 25, 2013 Edition

http://www.dreamstime.com/-image28379626Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. Often they are from the people whose work I admire or resonate with me. More importantly, I picked these articles to help my fellow IT professionals be more successful. I hope you will find these ideas thought-provoking at the minimum. Even better, I hope these ideas will, over time, help my fellow IT pros make better decisions, be awesome, and kick ass!

When it comes to providing IT services, Barclay Rae believes that we do need to be consistent, accountable, reliable and able to deliver and demonstrate value. He outlines 7 simple, positive, and practical tips on how to be successful with IT service management. Start from the beginning: Introduction, Step 1, Step 2, Step 3, Step 4, Step 5, Step 6, ITSM Goodness Step 7: Change and Sell the Pitch (HDIConnect)

There are people who advocate that, while IT is essential, IT is also commodity like utilities. Robert Plant believes that company leaders should create stronger, progressive IT positions. He also suggests three areas where companies can take actions. IT Doesn’t Matter (to CEOs) (Harvard Business Review)

Many IT organizations have the tendency to rip-and-replace and constantly use new solutions to look for quick wins. Recalling a lesson he learned from his father 20 years ago, Jarod Greene thinks we should pay more attention to what we already have and not overlook any obvious value that is already there. You Can Read the Magic Quadrant, After You Finish Cleaning Your Room (Gartner)

With the large number of business blogs out on the Internet, the mediocre blogs probably outnumber the successful ones by a huge margin. Patsi Krakoff outlines what a successful business blog should have and what you can do to make yours better. Is Your Business Blog “Just Okay?” Here’s How to Change It (Writing On The Web)

When we extend deadlines, research suggests that we have difficulty using the newly-found time wisely. Heidi Grant Halvorson explains why do we squander the extra time and what can we do about it. Here’s What Happens When You Extend Deadlines (Dr. Heidi Grant Halvorson)

Often we are trained to focus on the end goal and not letting things detract us from the ultimate objective, but that focus along is not sufficient. Kathy Simmons recommends what successful executive should do. Are You a Results Oriented Executive? (The Executive Update)

Hiring the right people is probably the most valuable contribution a manager can make for his/her organization. Rob England recommends how we can do a better job hiring for our organizations. How to Hire (The IT Skeptic)

Taking a chapter from Professor Rita Gunther McGrath’s most recent book, The End of Competitive Advantage: How To Keep Your Strategy Moving As Fast As Your Business; Theodore Kinni points out how the effect that transience on corporate strategy may have on our careers. Can Your Career Survive Transient Competitive Advantage? (Strategy+Business)

While we all claim to hate suck-ups, we seem to surround ourselves with them. Marshall Goldsmith shows how we unknowingly encourage sucking up and what we can do to change our behavior.  All of Us Are Stuck on Suck-Ups (Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog)

Rachel Martin believes there is a list of living intentional type things we should do with our child. She suggests what her list looks like. 20 Things I Will Not Regret Doing With My Kid. (finding joy)

Fresh Links Sundae – February 24, 2013 Edition

http://www.dreamstime.com/-image5686314Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work resonates with me, and I hope you will find them at least thought-provoking or something of value.

Today’s business environment calls for the IT professionals to facilitate or even lead business change initiatives. Bob Lewis explains what the IT professionals need to understand when it comes to working with business changes. He also provides a humorous example. For next-gen IT, resistance is fertile (InfoWorld)

Getting ready to start a competitive analysis of Service Catalogue offerings in the ITSM market, Barclay Rae outlines the criteria he plans to use for the assessments. Assessment Criteria for Service Catalogue [] (The ITSM Review)

While many organizations have undertaken IT service management initiatives, few are realizing the full benefits and true potential of ITSM. Instead of handling ITSM simply as a project, Charles Araujo advocates why ITSM needs to become a movement with a vision and a community. You Are the ITSM Community (ITSM Portal)

When it comes to formulating BYOD policies, many organizations take the default position of treating the users as risks. Patrick Gray lists three alternatives to preempting disaster by partnering with the users in protecting the corporate data. Three BYOD policies for keeping workers (and IT) happy (TechRepublic)

Many organizations have established their own business analysis standards based on the needs and preferences of their stakeholders. Laura Brandenburg outlines some essential requirement specifications that a business analyst might consider for any project. What Requirements Specifications Does A Business Analyst Create? (Bridging the Gap)

Reflecting from the recent Grammy Award given to the band “Fun,” Scott Eblin outlines three encouragements to leaders who are plugging along without much in the way of positive feedback. Three Ways to Get the Recognition You Deserve (Next Level Blog)

From his recently published e-book, Jim Taggart prepares a list of suggestions for the boomer managers to keep in mind when interacting with their younger co-workers. Jim also posted another blog entry which talks about the interaction from the Gens X and Y’s perspective. Leadership and the Inter-Generational Divide: 10 Suggestions for Boomer Managers and Executives (ChangingWinds)

As more of us work on brand-building in a more connected environment, the question of whether one should exchange his/her own time for non-cash compensation comes up more often. Seth Godin outlines some evaluation criteria that can help you determine the productive use of your time and resources. Should you work for free? (Seth’s Blog)

There are many ways to improve interpersonal relationships, and Marshall Goldsmith believes that asking is one thing we all should do more often. He also suggests several simple ways of asking, listening, and learning from the feedback. Why Don’t We Ask? (Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog)

Fresh Links Sundae – December 16, 2012 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work resonates with me, and I hope you will find something of value.

While ITIL may advocate the concept that problems come into play only after incidents had occurred, Rob England gives an introduction into what a proactive problem management process should look like and address. Proactive Problem Management (The ITSM Review)

In a two part series, Abhinav Kaiser outlines the steps for setting up a software license management process in your organization. Best practices for software license management [Part 2] (TechRepublic)

Implementing a service catalog can sometimes turn into a major undertaking for many organizations. Barclay Rae gives an overview of why having a service catalog, what it should look like, and what to expect when putting one together. Service Catalog is Simple…or Should Be (Barclay Rae Website)

Most people would agree with the notion that change is the norm in our time. Karen Ferris explains why the desire of staying static and avoiding changes is no long an option. CHANGE: Don’t be a statistic [] (The ITSM Review)

Reflecting from a recent McKinsey Quarterly article “Capturing value from IT infrastructure innovation,” Gregory Tucker shares his view of what the service management concept is turning into. Service Management Is Dead (Tracted IT Management)

In this information-rich age we live in, managing knowledge and classifying information can be a formal challenge. Aprill Allen discusses two methods of information classification schemes and how they can be used together. Taxonomies and Folksonomies (Knowledge Bird)

In a presentation to a group of computer science students in London, Simon Morris describes the software development methodology used within his organization. ServiceNow development methodology presentation to QMUL (ServiceNow Community)

Instead of making the typical New Year resolutions that get quickly deferred or forgotten, Jeff Haden outlines 21 goals that can go a long way to improve your personal effectiveness. 21 Things That Beat Your New Year’s Resolution (Inc.com)

Like so many things in life, the subject of leadership does not have one single source of truth, but a number of competing ideas or opinions. Jim Taggart suggests what each of us can do to better understand the field of leadership and management. A Big (Obvious) Idea for Leadership–There Are NO Experts! (ChangingWinds)

Seth Godin talks about how companies start in serving the niche market. Later on, some of those companies transform their products/services to serving the mass market. I think supporting the IT technologies in organizations has gone through the similar transformation as well. The question remains is how should an IT department deal with the two very different market/user segments within their own organization. The cycle of customers who care (Seth’s Blog)

Fresh Links Sundae – November 18, 2012 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work resonates with me, and I hope you will find something of value.

From his article at the recent ITSM 12 conference, Robert Stroud explains why the Service Manager needs to be more versed in the business and less in technology, a transition from a purely operational role to a more business oriented one. Delivering ‘Innovative Business’ – The Next Challenge for Service Managers (Service Management – CA Technologies)

Using a railroads operation example, Rob England discusses what a Problem Management process is and how it differs from Incident Management. Problem Management Defined (The ITSM Review)

When measuring the effectiveness of your knowledge management effort, Simon Morris talks about the use of metrics and how to improve them to yield a more meaningful measurement. Tracking user behaviour with Cohort Analytics (ServiceNow Community)

Referring to the recent NY Times columnist Nate Silver’s work on the presidential election, Bob Lewis talks about why hard evidence and careful analysis really should be the cornerstones of business decision-making. The cloud of intellectual relativism has a Silver lining (IS Survivor Publishing)

Although nature disasters tend to grab our attention as prominent threats to the business, the human risk factors should not be overlooked. Kirstie Magowan outlines the approaches we can take to minimize the human risk factors in order to protect the business from avoidable threats. Take care of your human risk factors first (Common Sense and Service Management)

Although there are many poorly implemented SLAs and some people are calling for its abolishment, Barclay Rae advocates that there are better ways to arrive at a solid SLA that is valuable to ITs customers. SLAs (Barclay Rae)

Attracting great people who can fit well into an organization is a common challenge for many hiring managers. Nick Corcodilos explains why hiring great people should be based on common interests, not common desperation. Yada, Yada, Yada: Desperate hiring (Ask The Headhunter)

Talking with Cal Newport, author of So Good They Can’t Ignore You, Jeff Haden discusses why a popular career management belief might not be practical and require a second thought. Why ‘Do What You Love’ Is Terrible Advice [] (Inc.com)

I just finished the mentoring program with my Ascend USC student mentees, and I am going to miss working with them. To learn more about what else you can do bless the young ones you love, check out what Rachel Martin has suggested. 51 Things You Can Do That Will Bless Your Kids (finding joy)

While you are working hard to bless and empower your young ones, don’t stop there. Check out what Toni Birdsong has suggested you can do in their online worlds. Catch Your Kids Being Awesome Online (InternetSafety.com Blog)

Fresh Links Sundae – October 14, 2012 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work resonates with me, and I hope you will find something of value.

In a two-part post, Bob Lewis talks about how the combination of Release Management, scrum, Goldratt’s Theory of Constraints can be leveraged to manage IT work and achieve more consistent results. The best way to manage IT projects is to eliminate them (Advice Line)

Using New Zealand’s healthcare experience as a reference, Kirstie Magowan talks about the difference between IT users and IT customers, as well as the implications to providing IT services. This user vs. customer differentiation is tough! (Common Sense and Service Management)

If you are working on engineering a service management solution for your organization, Alicia Choo posted a sample operating procedure document and a few other support documents that may help in your endeavor. My take on ITSM and IT Governance: Service Engineering Management (Choofca’s Brain Dump)

Rather than simply “managing” knowledge, Aprill Allen advocates that Knowledge Management is more about “enabling.” It’s not really about knowledge management (Knowledge Bird)

Reflecting from recent experience with a successful client project, Barclay Rae outlines some lessons learned from developing and implementing SLM and a service catalog. Service Catalog – real life secrets of success (BarclayRae Website)

When it comes to standard CMM methodology, the typical flow is to define, control, manage, and improve. Rob England argues that improvement should come first, then manage and measure, and finally standardize and make it repeatable. Improve first (The IT Skeptic)

Although switching from one industry to another can be daunting, Adrian Reed suggests five ways a business analyst can use to get up to speed when joining a new industry. Starting in a new domain? Don’t Panic! (Bridging the Gap)

Using an analogy from the movie Moneyball, Michael Mauboussin describes what qualities that useful statistics should have and the sequence of choosing the right statistics. Four Steps to Measuring What Matters (Harvard Business Review)

While many organizations place great emphasis on leaders to develop their employees, Michael Schrage suggests that perhaps those same organizations should also pay attention to how their best people and performers can improve the managers whom those employees report to. Do Your Employees Make You a Better Manager? (Harvard Business Review)

When it comes to dealing with iterations of problem, Seth Godin suggests how to overcome them by doing something different, or in his words, initiating a new “up cycle.” Cycle worse, cycle better (Seth’s Blog)

Fresh Links Sundae – September 9, 2012 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates some pieces of information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work resonates with me, and I hope you will find something of value.

Because people are often the most critical factor for ITSM success, Stephen Mann relays some people-oriented guidance from his colleague, Eveline Oehrlich, and his own on how to put together the best roles and skill sets in place. Staffing For IT Service Delivery Success: Think Employee, Think Customer, Then Repeat (Forrester Blogs)

Many organizations try to minimize the presence of shadow IT because they can present unmanaged risks. Instead of trying eliminating shadow IT, Bob Lewis suggests how embracing shadow IT might help improving outcomes from the revenue and costs perspectives. Stop stomping out shadow IT (IS Survivor Publishing)

Finding competitive advantage through continuous innovation is already an established idea, and IT can be a major contributor to that movement. Damon Edwards explains how the DevOps concept can enable the IT organization to be better leveraged by the business. Use DevOps to Turn IT into a Strategic Weapon (dev2ops)

One key benefit of the problem management process is to enable organizational learning. Barclay Rae suggests one important thing to do in order to get the most out of a problem management exercise. Problem Management Success – Start Using Causal Closing Codes (BarclayRae Website)

If you are working on putting together a Release Management process for your organization, Alicia Choo posted a sample operating procedure document that may help in your endeavor. My take on ITSM and IT Governance: Release Management (Choofca’s Brain Dump)

Referencing to several government-published resources on the BYOD movement, Martin Grobisen talks about the importance of formulating and putting a policy in place to address BYOD. Time to Implement a BYOD Policy (ITSM Lens)

With social media being one of the many options for building a brand, Anna Farmery outlines five steps to leverage social media for marketing. Five-Step Social Media Marketing Plan (The Engaging Brand)

Hiring consultants can be expensive and sometimes without the desired results, Patrick Gray outlines several ways to avoid wasting money and get the most benefits out of the consult’s help. How to win friends and waste money on consultants (TechRepublic)

Although effectiveness leadership can encompass different things to different people, Jeff Haden talks about the personal lessons he learned about leadership and suggests five ways he has used to improve his own effectiveness. 5 Leadership Lessons You Won’t Learn in B-School (Inc.com)

Because the IT organization is often entrusted by its company with access to many vital assets, Don Tennant suggests that trustworthiness is the most important, foundational characteristic for people in an IT organization. Don also outlines a few ideas for detecting deception when a breach has occurred. Tips on Detecting Deception in Your IT Organization (From Under The Rug)

Fresh Links Sundae – July 8, 2012 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates some pieces of information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work resonates with me, and I hope you will find something of value.

Taking a customer point of view, Stephen Mann discussed 12 areas where the service desk should consider for delivering outstanding customer service. 12 Pieces Of Advice For IT Service Desks – From A Customer! (Forrester Blogs)

Presented at the recent OVUM conference on ITSM in London, Barclay Rae showed us some solid, practical tips on how to get your ITSM effort off the ground and running. Tips for ITSM Goodness (Barclay Rae Website)

If you are working on putting together a monitoring or event management practice, Alicia Choo posted a couple of sample documents that may help in your endeavor. My take on ITSM and IT Governance: Event Management (Choofca’s Brain Dump)

With the recent service outage of the Royal Bank of Scotland and a few other banking institutions, Ros Satar tried to piece together a coherent view of this major incident and what we can learn from it. The RBS Glitch – A Wake Up Call? (The ITSM Review)

With technology often being the center of innovation, Perry Rotella talked about how IT organizations, large and small, can create environments that encourage innovation and agility to facilitate growth. CIO = Chief INNOVATION Officer (IT Transforming Business)

With the competing views of IT talent shortage vs. personnel glut, Robert Cringely discussed why this is such a difficult labor issue in IT. IT class warfare — It’s not just IBM (I, Cringely)

Because not everyone share one single viewpoint, Seth Godin explained why tailoring your messages to different audience bases is important for getting your points across. Superman, Batman and worldviews (Seth’s Blog)

Even though both strategies may sound similar, Jeff Hayden explained why one strategy will come out way ahead over the long run. Business Strategy: Be an Opportunist or Opportunistic? (Owner’s Manual)

Concerned about the over-consumption of information by our minds with the social web technologies, Anna Farmery gave suggestions on keeping our minds fit. Exercises for the Obese Mind (The Engaging Brand)

With pay for performance a common practice these days, Bob Sutton discussed why one particular practice, the forced-ranking system, can sometimes create unnecessary internal competitions and stifle cooperation. Dysfunctional Internal Competition at Microsoft: We’ve seen the enemy, and it is us! (Work Matters)

Fresh Links Sundae – April 15, 2012 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates some pieces of information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work I admire, and I hope you will find something of value.

5 Ways to Fix Your High Value Jerks Susan Cramm suggested strategies to deal with “talent jerks” who deliver results yet intimidate their colleagues and reports in the organization. (Valuedance)

Moving IT into the unknown with boldness, courage and strength to drive business value Robert Stroud discussed the importance of transforming IT from followers of the business to equal partners sharing in the common goals of the organization’s mission. (CA on Service Management)

Man Alive, It’s COBIT 5: How Are You Governing And Managing Enterprise IT? With the release of COBIT 5, Stephen Mann outlined his initial thoughts on the new framework from ISACA. (Forrester Blogs)

A Change Management Strategy for Clouds in Azure Skies Jeff Wayman discussed five Change Management strategies that can promote success to your cloud operations. (ITSM Lens)

Meet your iceberg. Now in 3D Roman Jouravlev explained why selling IT processes to business customers is, in most cases, pointless and doomed from the start. (ITSM Portal)

Leadership Encourages Hope Bret Simmons discussed what leaders can do to give the followers hope, in his word, the belief that one knows how to perform and is willing to direct and sustain consistent effort to accomplish goals that matter. (Positive Organizational Behavior)

10 Predictions from Experts on Big Data will Impact Business in 2012 10 Big Data predictions from experts at Forrester, Gartner, Ovum, O’Reilly, and more discussed how the Big Data realm will develop and impact business. (Evolven Blog)

Too much information Barclay Rae talked about the ‘inconvenient truth,’ where the conventional IT reporting is for the most part of little business or IT management value. (BarclayRae Website)

Reducing Negativity in the Workplace Marshall Goldsmith discussed a simple, yet effective strategy to reduce “whining time.” (Marshall Goldsmith)

The Great Collision Umair Haque talked about a Great Collision in which the future we want is at odds with the present we choose, and what to do about it. (Harvard Business Review)