Fresh Links Sundae – May 25, 2014 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. Often they are from the people whose work I admire or resonate with me. I hope you will find these ideas thought-provoking at the minimum. Even better, I hope these ideas will, over time, help my fellow IT pros make better decisions, be awesome, and kick ass!

For organizations that want to run IT as a business, how should IT price its services and charge its internal customers? Bob Lewis discusses the three broad cost categories for invoicing. Chargebacks – tips and techniques (IS Survivor Publishing)

The value of data in business is a popular discussion these days. For managers who want to learn more about how information is being captured, quantified, and used to make business decisions, Walter Frick has a reading list to get those managers started. An Introduction to Data-Driven Decisions for Managers Who Don’t Like Math (Harvard Business Review)

IT has a critical mission of helping business drive success; therefore, the business needs to share responsibility for IT investments and projects as well. Pearl Zhu recommends how CIOs and CFOs can build a strong relationship for IT governance effectiveness and efficiency. CIO-CFO Collaboration for IT Governance (Future of CIO)

With Agile, many organizations have a heavy focus on value generation. While value generation is important, Glen Alleman cautions that focusing on value in the absence of focusing on cost of that value can be a going-out-of-business strategy. To Stay In Business You Need to Know Both Value and Cost (Herding Cats)

Many organizations experience a common pitfall in implementing ITSM – they were investing effort in creating and maintaining configuration information but getting little or no value from their investment. Stuart Rance suggests a list of improvements that every organization should consider. What’s the Point of Configuration Management? (SysAid Blog)

Dan Kane has found that usually the most overlooked part of organizational change is that of consequences and rewards. He believes that every successful process/organizational change does three things thoroughly and well. The Big 3 Questions of Consequence (Hazy ITSM)

Courtney Nash believes that we might have reached a point in software development where we can no longer understand, see, or control all the parts because they are increasingly complex and distributed. She also has some recommendations on what we can do to develop and manage systems with an enormous degree of sophistication and complexity. Everything is distributed (O’Reilly Radar)

Many of us take on the challenge of making changes and find the changes can be both time-consuming and hard to do. Marshall Goldsmith recommends that having the courage to face the truth up front when setting goals can help us stick to the plan. The Five Reasons We Give Up (Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog)

Fresh Links Sundae – May 18, 2014 Edition

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-fruit-sundae-image15278271Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. Often they are from the people whose work I admire or resonate with me. I hope you will find these ideas thought-provoking at the minimum. Even better, I hope these ideas will, over time, help my fellow IT pros make better decisions, be awesome, and kick ass!

IT as a Service (ITaaS) is a shiny new buzzword for the old idea that CIOs should run IT as if it is an independent business. If IT is going to be a business serving internal customers, Bob Lewis believes that its business model matters. In a three-part series, he discusses what we can do to make the ITaaS model work. The ITaaS metaphor – picking and choosing the parallels (Part 1) Where the ITaaS IT-as-a-business metaphor does fit (Part 2) ITaaS: If they’re going to be your customers, make them your tenants (Part 3) (IS Survivor Publishing)

Many IT organizations are actively working toward becoming a service provider, but a necessary prerequisite to achieve this status is good IT-business alignment. Barton Kaplan recommends five best practices for IT organizations to adopt in order to realize the true promise of alignment. 5 Tactics Leading IT Organizations Use to Realize the Promise of Business Capabilities (VMware Accelerate)

Many organizations are placing a big bet on digital marketing to drive results. Jennifer Polk outline three things required for success in digital marketing. Three Things You Need to Get the Most out of Digital Commerce (Gartner Blogs)

Every project needs some core elements that are connected to the actual performance of the project and can be used to make decisions in a closed loop feedback system. Glen Alleman discusses the four core components that must be in place for a project. Four Critical Elements of Project Success (Herding Cats)

Is it reasonable just to deliver good service and not waste time by spelling things out with Service Level Agreements? Hanan Baranes believes that we should not take the short-cut if you really want to give good service and have happy customers. If You Don’t Have an SLA, You’re Delivering Bad Service (SysAid Blog)

Part of being able to deliver the premium level of service to our customers is to ensure that we have the necessary service management capabilities built and established. Ryan Ogilvie discusses some essential foundational steps to establish a service management program. Ensuring Service Management Stays Effective (Service Management Journey)

As a service provider with a complex infrastructure, Heroku has a codified framework for responding to incidents that require extensive coordination and communication. Mark McGranaghan shares what they do at Heroku for incident response for those who may be considering adopt and apply some of these practices for their organizations. Incident Response at Heroku (Heroku)

Similar to other change management efforts, a highly successful Agile transformation happens when there is executive engagement throughout. Steve Colasinski suggests that executives should consider leading the change by being personally involved and engaged with the Agile transformation activities. Agile Transformation & Executive Engagement (LeadingAgile)

Fresh Links Sundae – May 11, 2014 Edition

dreamstime_xs_13938429-215x240Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. Often they are from the people whose work I admire or resonate with me. I hope you will find these ideas thought-provoking at the minimum. Even better, I hope these ideas will, over time, help my fellow IT pros make better decisions, be awesome, and kick ass!

Not many people have mastered the framework of analytical storytelling by combining narrative along with visual analytics. Tom Davenport describes some examples of such framework. 10 Kinds of Stories to Tell with Data (Harvard Business Review)

A cloud strategy that doesn’t include some key elements will never reach its full potential for business transformation. Paul Chapman outlines those key competencies required for a successful cloud effort. To Succeed in the Cloud, CIOs Must Look Beyond Technology (VMware CloudOps)

In the famed Raiders of the Lost Ark series, Dr. Indiana Jones was fairly successful risk manager, who achieved his objectives. Steve Schlarman shows us what can GRC and Security programs learn from the legendary character. GRC and the Temple of Doom (RSA Archer GRC)

Recently Stuart Rance was asked by his customers what key performance indicators (KPIs) should be used to measure IT change management. He shares and explains some KPIs that may be useful to your team or organization. Defining Metrics for Change Management (SysAid Blog)

Enterprise Request Management is a new framework for incremental and evolutionary approach to centralizing and modifying business processes and service requests across the company. John Sundberg discusses five steps involved in implementing ERM. Implement Enterprise Request Management in Five Straightforward Steps (The ITSM Review)

Many projects wait till near the end of the project to ask the question of how much value can be realized, and often it’s too late. Glen Alleman explains how this critical question can be answered by sound project finance processes. Project Finance (Herding Cats)

As more organizations begin to implement Agile, more and more project managers are transitioning to become Scrum Masters. Eventually, the question of who should the Scrum Masters report to in an organizational hierarchy will come up. Len Lagestee has some scenarios and recommendations. Who Should the Scrum Master Report To? (Illustrated Agile)

Laura Brandenburg believes that clarity is one of the most fundamental attributes of writing good requirements. She discusses the steps for producing clear requirements. 5 Ways to Write Clearer Requirements (Bridging the Gap)

Fresh Links Sundae – May 4, 2014 Edition

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-image-sundae-image13526471Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. Often they are from the people whose work I admire or resonate with me. I hope you will find these ideas thought-provoking at the minimum. Even better, I hope these ideas will, over time, help my fellow IT pros make better decisions, be awesome, and kick ass!

To save costs and prepare for adoption of next-generation infrastructure technology, leading organizations are adopting commercial-style demand and service management. Himanshu Agarwal, Leandro Santos, and Irina Starikova describe the attributes of effective demand and service management for an IT organization. Managing the demand for IT infrastructure In a related article, Chandra Gnanasambandam, Michael Huskins, and Kara Sprague talk about overcoming several challenges of implementing the next generation of IT infrastructure. Next-generation IT infrastructure (McKinsey & Company)

In IT, we spend a great deal of time discussing the value of adopting ITSM. Earl Begley outlines the things we have to do in ITSM to help drive adoption, but are not covered in the typical ITIL courses. Things I didn’t learn in ITIL school (ITSM Review)

Configuration management supports the management of cloud services by providing information crucial to the other service management processes. Kai Holthaus discusses three common cloud-based models and the configuration management aspects to keep in mind for each model. Configuration Management in the Cloud (VMware Blogs)

Many IT organizations respond to calls, emails and chat session requests quickly, but those requests were then sent elsewhere for action. As a result, things slowed down significantly and IT customers still are not happy with the interaction with IT. Robert Stroud explains why today’s support centers cannot just “log and flog.” Close the Loop on “Log and Flog” Service Management (CA Service Management)

With the technology becomes more accessible, more business executives are willing to lead technology initiatives. Business-led IT initiatives are here to stay, but many business teams still struggle. Raf Gelders discusses ways IT can help the business teams extract value from their technology investments. Why Not All Business-Led IT Takes Off (CIO Leadership Council)

Although data analysis is at top priority of many businesses these days, the ROI and success rate of such projects are still very low. Pearl Zhu explains what the challenges are and how to overcome them. The Brutal Truth about Data Analysis (Future of CIO)

It can be difficult to get it right when estimating software development projects in an agile paradigm. Glen Alleman tackles three common estimating situations and recommends approaches for those situations. How To Fix Martin Fowler’s Estimating Problem in 3 Easy Steps (Herding Cats)

When asked about what changes that can be made to manage more effectively, many C-level executives believe they should delegate more. Marshall Goldsmith argues that, when it comes to delegation, quality still trumps quantity. Don’t Delegate More – Delegate More Effectively (Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog)