Change Management Process Design – Part 2

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This post is part two of a series where we discuss the ITIL-based Change Management process and how to put one together. In the previous post, I presented some design considerations such as goal/purpose; the intended scope; and roles and responsibilities. In this follow-up post, I will discuss additional process governance and planning elements.

Categorization and Prioritization

Why do we categorize? Proper categorization can facilitate or drive certain governance decisions. Categorization can drive the lead time required for review and approval. Categorization can also determine what process workflow or approval authorities may be required to facilitate the change. ITIL recommends three types of change request: Standard, Emergency, and Normal. If ITIL’s definitions work for your organization, go ahead and adopt them. However, that categorization alone is probably not sufficient to describe the changes and how they affect the business operation. Finding a way to describe the risk and impact associated with a change is also important. Risk can be used to measure the level of the potential disruption of business operation associated with a change request. Impact can be used to measure how far-reaching a change can be. The key idea here is to find a way of properly assessing changes and managing risks.

When designing a categorization scheme for changes, I recommend examining your existing incident and problem categorization scheme and make an attempt to have a consistent categorization across the ITSM processes. I believe that a uniform categorization will make risk assessment more reliable than not having it. A consistent categorization could also make the design and analysis of the reports more meaningful. Some organizations choose to use separate categorization schemes for incidents, problems, and changes – a decision sometimes influenced by the organizational boundaries or the tools on-hand. Just keep in mind that a change management exercise is also a very much a risk management exercise.

Workflow and Documentation

Once you have the change requests categorized, you will need a workflow to process the change requests for review and approval with a well-defined lead time. These lead-times are necessary to provide the adequate time required to review and to approve the change request by the change manager and the stakeholders. Many organizations I was with have had either weekly or semi-weekly CAB review cycles. That means the approval and scheduling timing need to be well defined so CAB and change manager can review, discuss, approve, or even escalate the change with sufficient time. Also, different types of change or change risks/impacts will likely require different lead-times or maybe different work-flows to process them. Some organizations may be required to impose change freeze windows in order to support critical business systems or processes.

Just like other ITSM artifacts, change requests should be documented and, ideally, captured in a tool. The levels of detail needed to be capture will vary from one organization to another, but most organizations should capture the baseline of required data such as:

  • Change requester, owner, and implementer
  • Type, category, risk, impact, priority as defined in the process document
  • Configuration items (systems, applications, devices, etc.) affected by the change
  • Summarized and detailed description of the change
  • Business justification
  • Proposed schedule or implementation timing
  • Dependencies and required resources identified
  • Key approvers needed
  • Final report on the closure of the change

Once the changes are captured and processed, the process guide also needs to define the necessary communication and coordination mechanisms to support the change management activities.

Metrics and Measurements

Tracking and measurement are the key elements to the continual process improvement. Depending on the goal and purpose defined for the change management process, we can further define the critical success factors and the key performance indicators we will need to track in order to measure the effectiveness, efficiency, and the quality of the process. The process design should spell out the metrics requirements and make sure the tools can support the required metrics.

Process Integration

It will also be useful to define some potential connecting ITSM processes to CHM. Incidents, problem, change, configuration, and release management process all have activities that are closely tied to one another. Which processes will trigger the CHM process from an upstream workflow or will receive the CHM output downstream? If you have an incident identified and it requires changes implemented to restore the service, how will those changes be handled? If you practice problem management in your environment, how will CHM process be injected into the root-cause remediation or deficiency remediation activities? Will the incident tickets, problem records, configuration items, and requests for change be linked in some fashion? These are just some governance related questions that should be considered upfront as they will affect how you plan and design the CHM process.

In the last two posts, we just went over a number of governance and planning elements for the change management process. We talked about the scope and purpose of the process, how we categorize and prioritize changes, the essential roles for executing the process, the necessary categorization, workflow, metrics, and integration with other ITSM processes. On the next post, we will go over and example process flow and spell out more details for the change management activities.

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