Fresh Links Sundae – December 30, 2012 Edition

Fresh Links Sundae encapsulates information I have come across during the past week. They maybe ITSM related or not entirely. Often they are from the people whose work resonates with me, and I hope you will find something of value.

Reflecting back on a similar blog post from 2012, Stephen Mann outlines what we learned from practicing ITSM in 2012 and what to look forward to in 2013. The Top 10 IT Service Management Challenges For 2013 – But What Did You Achieve In 2012? (Forrester Blogs)

Sometimes having too much of something can create similar problems as not having enough. Bob Lewis suggests that happiness often comes down to knowing what you have and how it compares with others. A holiday card to the IT industry, 2012 (InfoWorld)

As a follow-up to his recent article on problem management, Rob England talks about that root cause analysis is much more than just finding that “one” cause that resulted in the failure of the system. Root Cause – Railways don’t like derailments (The ITSM Review)

Although the financial and productivity analysis for BYOD programs has been mixed, Jon Hall advocates that organization should still consider BYOD programs and have some level of trust of their employees to find the best tools for themselves. Of course there is value in BYOD, and users know where to find it. (Evolving ITSM)

Many organizations use social media technologies to enhance their brands, but not everyone practice social media with the same, high level of skills and awareness. Kirstie Magowan outlines several suggestions on how to mitigate or repair the damages when something goes horribly wrong. A new disaster recovery specialty (Common Sense and Service Management)

Significant time and money are spent recreating and managing documents around and outside most organizations. Patrick Gray believes we already have the tools and can make a better use of them. Tools for mitigating time and money lost to poor document management (TechRepublic)

Finding a job or a career that blends and balances the talent, passion, and market considerations is not easy for most people. Gianpiero Petriglieri explains what questions we should be asking of ourselves and what factors to consider. Finding the Job of Your Life (Harvard Business Review)

Drawing from his past experience as a student, Marshall Goldsmith explains why it is often easy to stay self-centered and to see our problems reflected in others than it is to see them in ourselves. Seeing Ourselves as Others Do (Marshall Goldsmith Personal Blog)

Hiring is easily one of the most critical tasks a manager does for his organization. Jeff Haden outlines six reasons why bad hiring happens and what can be done to mitigate such risks. 6 Reasons Why You Hire the Wrong People (Inc.com)

Because robots have no feelings and can be programmed to be objective and compliant, Scott Adams suggests that robots will likely replace the middle management sooner than with the skilled labor. The Future of Middle Management (Scott Adams Blog)

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