Major Incident Handling Process Design – Part Two

This post is the part two (and concluding part) of a series where we discuss the Major Incident Handling process and how to put one together. Previously we discussed the elements and considerations that should go into the process design. In this post, I have elaborated some of those considerations further with a sample process flow and a corresponding process design.

Sample Major Incident Handling Process Flow

Sample Major Incident Handling Process Design

A major incident generally imposes higher impact and requires special attention to resolve it. To summarize, I think an effective Major Incident Handling process design should clearly define at least the following who-does-what-by-when-and-how elements:

  • What constitutes a major incident in your organization? What criteria do you use to quickly and effectively determine and declare a major incident?
  • Who is accountable for coordinating and controlling the activities during a major incident exercise? The Major Incident Manager role can be fulfilled by a person or by a team, and she needs the proper authority to direct the activities and the people who are involved.
  • How the resolution efforts will be coordinated and conducted? The exact details may vary from one organization to another, or even from one incident to another. The general approach should be worked out beforehand, and the Major Incident Manager should be trained to utilize the approach as consistently as possible.
  • What escalation or communication approach will be used during and after the Major Incident?
  • What metrics will be used to measure the effectiveness of the process? Keep them simple, easily understood and reasonably painless to collect the data.
  • What format of communication and reporting will be used for the major incident? Who will get what type of information? Try to keep the contents appropriate for the intended audience.

I hope the information presented so far has been helpful. Please feel free to suggest options or other approaches that have worked for your organization.

Links to other posts in the series

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